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An Introduction To The Manufacture Of Powder (microencapsuled) Fragrance Concentrates At Etosha's Establishment
CONCEPT
Liquid fragrance concentrates have been used in the Soap, Detergent and cosmetic industry for several decades. Most of the fragrance components exhibit considerable sensitivity to aggressive conditions, like extreme pH levels, active enzymes and other highly active ingredients of various formulations. Moreover, they are oils or liquids, which are difficult to work with in some applications. To overcome these disadvantages the powdered or encapsulated fragrances have been developed to be used by manufacturers in products such as Soap, Detergents and Cosmetic etc. in which dry mixing, shelf life and fragrance stability are important.
ADVANTAGE
To produce best-powdered or encapsulated fragrances the numerous materials have been tested for use as fragrance encapsulating agents. However, each of these encapsulating agents has one or more limitations. For instance, gum arabic, a traditional material of choice, provides good retention of volatiles but exhibits poor protection against oxidation. Partially hydrolyzed starches (i.e.), maltodextrins and glucose syrup solids give very good protection results but yields poor retention of volatiles. Therefore, to introduce a superior fragrance carrier that exhibits multiple desirable functionalities. A most recent and sophisticated fragrance encapsulating process 'INTERT- POLYMER COMPLEXATION' has been developed and introduced as a unique way of fragrance entrapment (molecular encapsulation). This process converts liquid fragrances into non- hygroscope, powdered fragrance, thus providing a clean, standardized form of fragrance ingredient.
RELEASE OF COMPLEX FRAGRANCES
In aqueous solutions there is a dynamic equilibrium between the free and complex states of the guest and the matrix polymer. The guest molecule can get out of the cavity of the matrix-polymer rapidly. When a dry complex is used, the first step in release is the dissolution, followed by the complete dissociation, of the complex. As a result, the guest can be rapidly released from the complex to elicit the desired aroma response.
STABILITY
Many fragrance components have labile chemical moieties that are sensitive to extreme pH levels, highly active enzymes, light, heat, air (oxygen) etc. Inert-Polymer complexation can provide protection against these destabilizing factors. When a fragrance is complexed it occupies the limited space of the cavity of Inert- Polymer. Therefore, it is isolated and thus outs of contact with the environment. As a result of this stabilization, increased shelf life, and reduced loss of active ingredients owing to degradation or evaporation are observed.
For Information On Fragrance Concentrates Please Refer Our Separate Data Sheet.
The information and statements contained herein are provided free of charge. They are believed to be accurate at the time of publication, but Etosha makes no warranty with respect thereto, including but not limited to any results to be obtained or the infringement of any proprietary rights. Use or application of such information or statements is at user's sole discretion, without any liability on the part of Etosha. Nothing herein shall be construed as a license of or recommendation for use which infringes upon any proprietary right.
A Comparitive Advantage Of Powder (microencapsulated) Fragrances Over Liquid Fragrances In Detergents And Cosmetic Applications
POWDER FRAGRANCES
  • Fragrance oils are entrapped into a wall matrix of a specially developed inert polymer and are therefore protected from oxidation, moisture, light and other highly aggressive ingredients.
  • Provides a control release mechanism.
  • It remains isolated and thus outs of contact with other chemicals. As a result, increased shelf life, reduced loss of active ingredients owing to degradation is observed.
  • No loss due to evaporation makes it most economical and cost effective.
  • Highly convenient while mixing with other powders upto the finest micro-dispersion levels and facilities systematic release of aroma before and after use.
  • Does not interfere with the color of finished product.
  • LIQUID FRAGRANCES
  • Are free flowing liquids thus exposed to various active chemical ingredients, when present in a final mix.


  • Have no such mechanism.
  • Remains in direct contact with the other ingredients thus prone to degradation leads to bad or low odor in a passage of time.
  • Almost 05 to 10% fragrance is lost due to evaporation during the open spray application in production process.
  • Is difficult to get dispersed and form local droplets, which prevents systematic release of aroma in the finished product before and after use.
  • Some time interfere with thew colour of finished product.
  • The information and statements contained herein are provided free of charge. They are believed to be accurate at the time of publication, but Etosha makes no warranty with respect thereto, including but not limited to any results to be obtained or the infringement of any proprietary rights. Use or application of such information or statements is at user's sole discretion, without any liability on the part of Etosha. Nothing herein shall be construed as a license of or recommendation for use which infringes upon any proprietary right.
    MICROCAPSTM
    MICROENCAPSULATED FLAVOUR
    CONCEPT
    Liquid flavor concentrates have been used in the food industry for several decades. Many components of flavor concentrates exhibit considerable sensitivity to air, light or heat. Moreover, they are oils or liquids, which are difficult to work with in some applications. To overcome these disadvantages the powdered or encapsulated flavors have been developed to be used by food manufacturers in products such as puddings, bakeries, deserts, beverages and pharmaceutical dry suspensions and dietary supplements etc. in which dry mixing, shelf life and flavor stability are important.
    ADVANTAGE
    To produce best powdered or encapsulated flavors the numerous materials have been tested for use as flavor encapsulating agents. However, each of these encapsulating agents has one or more limitations. For instance, gum arabic, a traditional material of choice, provides good retention of volatiles but exhibits poor protection against oxidation. Partially hydrolyzed starches (i.e.), maltodextrins and glucose syrup solids give very good protection results but yields poor retention of volatiles. Therefore, to introduce a superior flavor carrier that exhibits multiple desirable functionalities. A most recent and sophisticated flavor encapsulating process 'CYCLODEXTRIN- COMPLEXATION' has been developed and introduced as a unique way of flavor entrapment (molecular encapsulation). This process converts liquid flavorings to the non-hygroscope, powdered flavor, thus providing a clean, standardized form of flavor ingredient.
    INCLUSION COMPLEXION OF FLAVORS
    Flavor compounds are included into the molecular cavities of cyclodextrin to form an inclusion complex without involving covalent bonding.
    RELEASE OF COMPLEX FLAVORINGS
    In aqueous solutions there is a dynamic equilibrium between the free and complex states of the guest and cyclodextrin. The guest molecule can get out of the cavity of the cyclodextrin rapidly. When a dry complex is used, the first step in release is the dissolution, followed by the complete dissociation, of the complex. In flavor applications, multiple factors will affect the release of complexed flavors. For instance, water in the saliva will dilute the complex, allowing more of the complex to dissolve and release the guest. Some components in the food may complex with the cyclodextrin of associate with the released flavors so that the dissociated guest is unable to recomplex with the carrier. As a result of these factors, the guest can be rapidly released from the complex to elicit the desired flavor response.
    STABILITY
    Many flavor components have labile chemical moieties that are sensitive to light, heat or air (oxygen). Cyclodextrin complexation can provide protection against these destabilizing factors. When a flavor is complexed it occupies the limited space of the cavity of cyclodextrin. Therefore, it is isolated and thus out of contact with the environment. As a result of this stabilization, increased shelf life, and reduced loss of active ingredients owing to degradation or evaporation are observed.
    METABOLISM AND TOXICOLOGY OF THE CARRIER
    When ingested, only an insignificant portion of flavor is absorbed from the intestinal tract. The bulk of orally administered cyclodextrin passes through the digestive system to the colon to be partially hydrolyzed by colonic flora. Once the macrocyclic ring is opened the cyclodextrin is further metabolized and absorbed as other starch hydrolysates. A series of toxicological studies have been performed on cyclodextrins. No LD values have been determined for the oral toxicity of cyclodextrin because the high doses result in no mortality of the animals. No toxic effects have been found in 90 day and one-year study in rats or dogs or in mutigeneration studies in rats. Various other toxicological tests including dermal irritation, ocular irritation, inhalation, mutaginicity, Ames test, chromosomal aberration, and teratology have shown no adverse effects of cyclodextrin.
    NOTE
    The information and statements contained herein are provided free of charge. They are believed to be accurate at the time of publication, but Etosha makes no warranty with respect thereto, including but not limited to any results to be obtained or the infringement of any proprietary rights. Use or application of such information or statements is at user's sole discretion, without any liability on the part of Etosha. Nothing herein shall be construed as a license of or recommendation for use which infringes upon any proprietary right.